Drug Crime Glossary of Terms

Below is a glossary of drug crime terms that may be relevant to your Michigan case. Always contact an experienced criminal defense lawyer if you have been charged with a drug crime offense, or if you believe you are under investigation for drug crime.

Appeal: a request to a higher court to review the decision of a lower court. After a drug crime conviction, it may be possible to appeal the verdict or sentence. Contact Grabel & Associates for aggressive post-conviction defense.

Charge: the formal accusation a person is facing, such as “Possession of a Schedule I Illegal Substance” or “Possession With Intent.”

Conviction: once a jury or judge has determined that a defendant is guilty, he or she has been convicted and the case moves toward sentencing.

Drug Courts: special courts in some Michigan counties focused on rehabilitation. In some cases, drug courts may allow defendants to avoid jail time and other penalties in exchange for a rehab program, probation, and other restrictions. Always consult an attorney and consider every legal option as early on in your case as possible.

Drug Cultivation: growing an illicit substance such as marijuana is illegal in Michigan, and can result in severe penalties, which change with the amount of drug cultivated and other details of the case.

Drug Distribution: involves transferring drugs from one person to another. Often referred to as “drug dealing,” distributing drugs can result in extremely serious criminal penalties.

Drug Manufacture: the creation of drugs, for example methamphetamines. Manufacturing drugs is a serious crime in Michigan, and if convicted you could face life changing penalties.

Drug Trafficking: distribution or transportation of large amounts of drugs, usually across state borders or in some cases internationally, is referred to as drug trafficking. Drug trafficking is a serious offense, and could be prosecuted in federal court.

Federal Charge: serious drug crime cases may involve federal agencies such as the DEA or FBI, and may be heard in federal court. These federal charges often result in more serious criminal penalties.

Felony: a felony charge carries more serious penalties than a misdemeanor, often with years of jail time and significant fines possible.

Grow Houses: houses used for the cultivation of an illegal drug, usually marijuana.

Grow-op: see “Grow Houses.”

Illicit: a term for “Illegal.”

Prosecutor: the attorney assigned to prove a defendant is guilty.

Mandatory Life Sentence: in Michigan repeat offender drug crime cases, a mandatory life sentence may apply. Michigan has extremely harsh penalties for drug crimes, and it is crucial to contact an experienced criminal defense lawyer if you have been charged with any offense.

Medical Marijuana: marijuana used to treat a medical condition (such as anxiety, glaucoma, cancer, etc), which is acquired with a valid prescription.

Minor in Possession: MIP charges can occur when a person under 21 is found in possession of alcohol or an illicit substance.

Misdemeanor: a less serious criminal offense (such as possession of a small amount of some illegal substances), misdemeanor charges can still result in severe penalties and should be taken very seriously.

Narcotic: a term for “drug.”

Possession: to be found with an illegal drug, drug paraphernalia, or other substance on your person, in your house, car, or otherwise knowingly in your control.

Possession With Intent: to knowingly have an illegal substance in your control, and either an amount that suggests you intend to sell or deliver the drug, or other reasons to believe you intended to distribute the drug.

Pre-File: a stage of a criminal case before charges have been “filed.” Also referred to as the “investigative” stage of a criminal case.

Prescription Drug Crime: drug crime involving unauthorized possession or distribution of prescription drugs, doctor prescriptions, or forged prescriptions.

Schedule I: part of Michigan’s drug classification system, Schedule I substances have no medical use and a high potential for abuse. Schedule One includes Ecstasy, LSD, Mushrooms, GHB, and Peyote.

Schedule II: drugs that have an approved medical purpose but a high potential for abuse. Includes Opium, Cocaine, Morphine, Oxycodone, and Methamphetamines.

Schedule III: drugs that have a moderate risk of abuse, including ketamine and morphine.

Schedule IV: drugs with a low potential for abuse, but still limited potential for addiction, including Valium, Rohypnol, and Xanax.

Schedule V: substances that may be able to be obtained over-the-counter, often with a very limited potential for abuse, including cough syrups with codeine or medicine containing ephedrine.

Sentencing Guidelines: the state of Michigan recommends minimum and maximum sentences for crimes based on specific details of a case. While judges often follow the sentencing guidelines, they may sentence a person to a greater or lesser sentence. Working with an attorney will allow you to evaluate the sentencing guidelines and how they could affect your case.

7411 (Seventy-Four Eleven) Sentencing: persons charged with certain drug crimes can avoid jail through 7411 sentencing, which allows a person to keep a clean record if they adhere to a judge’s orders. Our lawyers will help you look at every possible sentencing option and evaluate the best legal actions to take.

Contact Scott Grabel for MI Drug Crime Defense

Call 1-800-342-7896 now for aggressive drug crime defense in any of Michigan’s 83 counties. You can also contact our law firm online, and ask to set up a free case consultation with experienced Michigan drug crime criminal defense lawyer Scott Grabel. Contact Grabel & Associates now and fight for a beneficial case outcome.