How White-Collar Conspiracy Charges Work – An Example


In order to commit a white-collar conspiracy, the prosecution must prove four elements. First, it must be shown that there was an agreement made. Next, it must be shown that this agreement aimed at an unlawful purpose. Third, the defendant must have had both knowledge and intent. And finally, an overt act or substantial step towards achieving the unlawful goal of the conspiracy must have been committed. The difference between conspiracy charges and most other federal criminal charges is that an actual crime does not even need to be committed, other than the conspiracy to commit a crime itself.

Usually, the penalties for conspiracy correspond to the penalties for the actual crime, usually a level or two lower than the maximum for the actual crime. It is critical that you take white collar conspiracy charges seriously, and that you act fast to secure a competent attorney if you have been accused of a misdemeanor or felony offense. The Grabel & Associates team is ready now to begin guiding you through your case, and we have the skill and experience that it takes to get clients exceptional results. Call our toll free hotline now for a free initial case consultation, or contact our firm online, to learn more about the steps you can take to defend your best interests throughout your case.

Scott Grabel founded our firm over 15 years ago and has developed one of the most respected state law defense practices in Michigan. Since then, we have added licensed federal attorneys who can guide clients through even the most complex cases. No matter what the specifics of your case, our attorneys are ready to begin fighting for you, and will protect your freedom, whatever it takes. Contact us now to learn more about how white-collar conspiracy charges work, and let our attorneys give you more information on what you could be doing to fight back with an attorney on your side. Don’t hesitate, act fast to get in touch by phone or online.

How White-Collar Conspiracy Charges in Michigan Work

Conspiracy is one of the most common federal charges a person can face. Even when a crime is committed, especially a white collar fraud offense, many different people will be involved, and some are bound to face conspiracy charges. As a result, federal prosecutors are very familiar with the type of evidence they need to get a conviction.

As mentioned above, there must be an agreement. This doesn’t necessarily need to be an explicit agreement, and could even just be mere association between two parties. There must be an unlawful purpose, however no illegal act actually needs to be committed. Additionally, the conspiracy doesn’t need to be successful at all, just intended. And knowledge, intent and substantial step are difficult to define, leaving prosecutors with broad discretion in determining who will go behind bars.

Our attorneys know how federal conspiracy cases work, and we are ready to start working with you or your loved one right now, no matter what the specifics of your case may be.

Example of White-Collar Federal Conspiracy

As an example, take a case involving money laundering. Say Charlie wants to move money from illegal activities offshore in order to avoid detection and evade taxes. Charlie tells his friend Juliett about his plan, and asks for her help compiling a list of false transactions that can be used to fraudulently move the money through to undetectable accounts. Now doing this would no doubt be illegal, and it seems Charlie should already face charges for whatever illegal activity he was involved in. However, say Charlie skips town, and his friend Juliett has merely prepared a list of potential transactions. Still, the government could charge Juliett with conspiracy to launder money.

In this hypothetical, there is an agreement to compile a list of false transactions, and Juliett knows Charlie has an unlawful purpose in mind. The prosecution could argue that by creating the list, or beginning to create the list, a substantial step towards the act was committed. But perhaps Juliett would have changed her mind had Charlie actually asked her to go through with helping him commit the crime, or after having more time to think about it. Still, she could face felony conviction and serious penalties.

White Collar Conspiracy Defense

Our federal defense attorneys have dealt with conspiracy charges of all kinds, including bankruptcy fraud, mail fraud, wire fraud, Ponzi schemes, money laundering, and securities fraud. This is one of the most complicated areas of the law, especially when skilled federal prosecutors are involved. You need a lawyer who has vast knowledge and direct case experience, and that is what Grabel & Associates provides. Our highly skilled attorneys understand what it takes to win and are ready to begin fighting for your freedom right away.

Contact Grabel & Associates for White Collar Conspiracy Defense

Call our toll free defense hotline now at 1-800-342-7896 or contact or firm online if you are not near a phone. We are available 24 hours a day, 7 days a week, and will begin working on your case as soon as needed. Why wait with so much potentially at stake and federal prosecutors already working against you? Contact our firm now for a free initial case consultation.