How to Request a Driving Record in Michigan


If you have a Michigan driver’s license, you have already signed over your consent to have your driving history tracked by the Michigan Department of Motor Vehicles. Past offenses are recorded on this history, as well as points handed out for violations, which can add up and lead to suspension, revocation, or other administrative penalties.

There are a variety of reasons why someone may want to know what is on their driving record, and it is possible to obtain your own driving record, as well as a driving record on behalf of another person if certain procedures are followed. The following information deals with what is on your driving record, how to get your driving record, and other important information. If you are facing a criminal charge and are wondering how additional points on your license could affect your case, it is critical to get in touch with an experienced attorney. Likewise, if your license has been suspended or revoked, and if you want to reinstate your license, contact a Michigan DL attorney as soon as possible.

Viewing Your Michigan Driver’s License History – DL Restoration Attorney

Grabel & Associates has been working with clients in driver’s license reinstatement cases and vehicle-related crime cases for over 10 years, and our lawyers know what it takes to fight back against wrongful conviction, points on your record, and license suspension. Contact our firm now for a free initial case consultation.

Your driving record includes information on any moving violations that may have occurred, drug crime information for some offenses, information about criminal violations and at-fault crashes, as well as any information on accidents, offenses, or convictions in other states.

Most convictions remain on your driving record for at least 7 years, though more serious convictions can stay on your record for 10 years. If you are convicted for an offense causing a death, it will remain on your record for life. In addition, drunk or drugged driving convictions can remain on your record permanently.

What is on a Michigan Driving Record? Why Would I Need My Driving History?

There are many reasons why you may need your driving record. Your driving history is included in background checks, and if you don’t know what is on it, it could cause you to miss out on job opportunities. In addition, you should keep on top of demerit points on your record, so that you can reduce the risk of future suspension or revocation. Your driving record could affect your insurance rate as well, and it is often worthwhile to be aware of what offenses are recorded.

If you are facing a criminal charge, you need to know how a conviction or plea deal could affect you, which is why it is essential to know what is already on your Michigan driving record.

Obtain Your Driving Record in Michigan

You can easily purchase your own driving record for $8 from the Department of Motor Vehicles using a record request form, or for $9 by walking into any branch office. If you use a record request form, you can mail it to the Record Lookup Unit, at 7064 Crowner Drive, Lansing Michigan, 48918-1502, or you can fax the completed form to 517-322-1624.

In order to obtain your driving record, you will need to provide your driver’s license number, full name, and date of birth. Requesting another person’s record is possible in certain cases, usually related to a business or government request. For a list of permissible reasons for record requests, visit the Michigan Secretary of State website.

Visit the DMV website to request an electronic copy of your driving record, or if you need your driving record in relation with a criminal case, contact an attorney for guidance.

Contact Grabel & Associates to Avoid License Suspension

When you face a criminal charge, it is crucial to work with an experienced defense lawyer who can effectively assist you in understanding how that accusation could interact with your past record and affect your future.

For a free initial case consultation, call 1-800-342-7896 or contact our team online. We are available 24/7 for clients statewide, and we handle driver’s license matters in all 83 of Michigan’s counties.

Please note: Recently DLAD/DAAD changed their name to the Administrative Hearings Section (AHS). Common use of the name AHS has not yet been widely accepted and the entity responsible for driver’s license hearings is still referred to as DLAD/DAAD in almost all legal areas, which is why we continue to use the term “DLAD/DAAD” throughout our website. More information about this change can be found at the Michigan Secretary of State’s website here.