Federal Public Corruption Attorney

Public corruption and government fraud are white collar crimes defined by a public official’s abuse of power in exchange (usually) for money or other valuable assets. The most common example of government fraud is the taking or solicitation of a bribe; however, there are countless other ways in which a public official can commit fraud. Because public corruption presents a substantial threat to community protection, quality of roads and other public services, and how the court system functions, the FBI and other federal agencies aggressively prosecute individuals suspected of committing or being involved in corruption.

Government Fraud

If you or a loved one is under investigation or arrest for public corruption, it is essential to obtain the legal representation of an experienced federal crimes attorney. These cases can be extremely complex, and so you need to make sure your attorney knows how to handle and defend these very serious charges. At Grabel & Associates, we have the resources and experience necessary to give you a strong, thorough defense.

For a free consultation with the federal crimes attorneys at Grabel & Associates, call us today at 1-800-342-7896.

Public Corruption and Government Fraud as Federal Crimes

The most common public corruption cases involve allegations that a public official received or solicited a bribe, kickback, or gratuity in return for or in connection with an official action. It is essential to note that, in many cases, the actual transfer of a bribe is not necessary to constitute a federal crime; public officials have been arrested in the past based on the promise of a bribe alone.

There are many federal statutes governing the prosecution of public corruption and government fraud. Some of the most common statutes used in public corruption cases include:

  • Hobbs Act — This Act prohibits actual or attempted robbery or extortion affecting interstate or foreign commerce "in any way or degree."
  • RICO — Also known as the Racketeer Influenced and Corrupt Organizations Act, this federal statute is designed to combat organized crime in the United States.
  • Mail Fraud — Federal mail fraud involves the use of mail services to perform specified fraudulent acts.
  • Wire Fraud — Federal wire fraud involves any fraudulent or deceitful scheme committed through the use of interstate wires.
  • The Travel Act — The Travel Act makes bribery in violation of state or federal law a federal offense.
  • 18 USC 201 — This is the federal official bribery and gratuity statute.
  • Foreign Corrupt Practices Act — This federal act makes it unlawful to make payments to foreign government officials to assist in obtaining or retaining business.

Types of Public Corruption

The many federal statutes listed above attempt to cover virtually any type or form of public corruption. Nonetheless, corruption and government fraud continue to be rampant across the United States. Some of the most common ways that public officials commit corruption and fraud include:

  • Bribery
  • Extortion (bribery, blackmail, and ransom)
  • Embezzlement of public monies
  • Campaign law violation
  • Defrauding the government
  • Money laundering
  • Bid rigging
  • Graft
  • Honest services fraud

It is important to note that public corruption can occur at the local, state, or federal level.

Potential Punishments for Public Corruption Convictions

As federal agencies attempt to curb instances of this federal crime, public corruption and government fraud carry very severe penalties. Generally, punishment following a successful conviction may include both imprisonment and fines. The fine may be commensurate with the value of the money, goods, or services that were fraudulently obtained. Moreover, the prison sentences associated with public corruption are known to be long, sometimes lasting up to 20 years. Lastly, if a public official has been caught committing corruption, then he/she may lose the ability to run for any public office thereafter.

Public corruption also carries a statute of limitations of five years. According to federal statute 18 USC 3282, an individual (in this case a public official) may be protected from prosecution if the alleged noncapital offense didn’t result in an indictment within five years of the offense.

Contact Grabel & Associates for Your Public Corruption Attorney

Federal investigators have substantial resources, money, and influence when conducting an investigation regarding public corruption. As such, these are not matters to take lightly. If a federal investigator has contacted you or a loved one, make sure you call a federal crimes attorney as soon as possible. Even though you have no formal charges filed against you (yet), an experienced attorney will begin acting as your spokesperson to investigators and diligently fight to prevent the charges from being filed.

If public corruption charges have been filed, however, then you absolutely need a corruption defense attorney to help you through this long, complex legal affair. At Grabel & Associates, we will tirelessly work for you, thoroughly examining the details of the case and presenting some of the most tried-and-true defense strategies available. We’ll confront the prosecution’s narrative, evidence, and witness testimony with evidence of our own, and we’ll always make sure that you’re informed regarding the court proceedings.

To speak with an expert federal crimes attorney about your case, call Grabel & Associates today. Free consultations are available 24/7.