Failing to Pay a Fine in Michigan for Suspended Driver’s License

If you commit a serious driving related offense in Michigan, it is possible that your license will be suspended. Failing to pay all fines and fees when due can lead to additional suspension time, or other serious penalties, and it is critical to work with an attorney who can help you stay on top of deadlines throughout your case. While you may think it isn’t necessary to pay a fine if you have already been convicted and penalized, the potential effects of failing to obey a court order are extremely serious and should never be overlooked.

There are numerous fines that can arise after a driving-related offense, including driver responsibility fees, license reinstatement fees, fines included in a sentence, and other court related fees. Failure to pay any of these can result in an indefinite license suspension, and anyone who is accused of not paying a fine should get in touch with a Michigan DL attorney immediately. Grabel & Associates has over a decade of experience representing clients both before and after a driver’s license suspension in Michigan criminal cases. For more information on how failing to obey a court ordered fine could affect you, contact our firm for a free initial case consultation.

Failure to Comply With a Court Order in Michigan

According to Michigan law, a person who fails to comply with an order or judgment of the court, including but not limited to, paying all fines, costs, fees, and assessments, is guilty of a misdemeanor. If a person fails to pay a court ordered fine, both criminal and administrative penalties can follow. The first step to avoiding additional penalties is contacting an attorney, though it is also extremely important to keep up with all court appearances, filings, and deadlines.

Penalties for Not Paying a Fine in Michigan

Anyone who fails to pay a court ordered fine could face imprisonment for up to 93 days, and a fine of up to $100. In addition, 28 days after failing to pay a fine, the court will mail a notice to the last known address of the person. Within 14 days of this notice, if the fine has still not been paid, the defendant’s driver’s license will be suspended.

A driver’s license suspension that arises after a person fails to pay a fine will remain in effect until:

  • The fine has been paid
  • A $45 driver’s license clearance fee for each failure to pay a fine has been paid

If your license has already been suspended, the suspension will likewise continue indefinitely until you pay the fine and other fees.

These penalties and the associated laws are outlined in Section 257.321a of the Michigan Vehicle Code. To learn more about how failing to pay a fine could affect your future, contact an attorney as soon as you can.

Reinstatement Fees for Michigan Suspended License

License suspension can result after accumulating too many points on your license, obtaining multiple speeding tickets or traffic violations, being convicted of DUI/OWI/OUIL, failing to appear in court or pay court fees, or even failing to pay child support.

If your license is suspended or revoked in Michigan, you may have to pay a reinstatement fee to get it back. Failing to pay a reinstatement fee will result in indefinite driver’s license suspension. No matter what fines are due, it is critical that you are completely aware of the consequences of not paying, and do all you can to meet all deadlines and avoid additional punishment.

An experienced criminal defense lawyer will know what penalties you may face if you have been charged with a driving related offense, and how a license suspension could change your situation.

Contact Grabel & Associates for Michigan Criminal Representation

To speak with an attorney about your driver’s license case, call 1-800-342-7896 now or contact our firm online for a free initial case consultation. Our talented attorneys are available 24/7 to begin working with you and are available now to represent you throughout every stage of your fight for justice.

Please note: Recently DLAD/DAAD changed their name to the Administrative Hearings Section (AHS). Common use of the name AHS has not yet been widely accepted and the entity responsible for driver’s license hearings is still referred to as DLAD/DAAD in almost all legal areas, which is why we continue to use the term “DLAD/DAAD” throughout our website. More information about this change can be found at the Michigan Secretary of State’s website here.