Restoring Your Driving Privilege in Lansing

On a Lansing, Michigan evening, a police officer pulled over a Pontiac G6 for a headlight that was out. The Pontiac sped away after briefly stopping. Officers lost the vehicle, but notified nearby counties. Only a few minutes later, in Isabella County, the vehicle was seen and attempted to be pulled over. This time, the driver did not stop and took off.

The Pontiac led the police on an extended chase over 3 counties. Shutting off all the lights in their car, the people in the Pontiac were witnessed as tossing items out of their car. These were later determined to be marijuana plants and other paraphernalia. After losing three tires, the vehicle was forced to stop. The driver and passenger surrendered themselves to police. The drivers, 21 and 17 years old, were arrested for fleeing and evading police, possession of marijuana, and driving on a suspended license.

These circumstances are certainly far more serious than what the majority of driver’s experience, but driving with a suspended license is a serious offense. Drivers are often punished with a suspended license after an OWI, multiple speeding tickets, several offences of driving without registration, or other similar violations. Being pulled over for going over the speed limit will not result in a suspended license; however, doing that five or six times just might land you in danger of having your driving rights suspended.

If your driver’s license has been suspended, getting your driving privilege back should be your top priority. Not being able to drive means that your entire life is on hold. Modern society is built upon the premise that the average Michigan citizen can drive where they need to when they wish. Having that ability taken away can put a stop to the way you live your life.

However, under no circumstances should you drive without a valid license. Driving with a suspended license will result in a fine and possible jail time, which varies depending on your driving record. If you have a significant amount of driving offenses or have had a suspended license before, the penalty can be even steeper. The maximum penalty for driving with a suspended license for the first time is a $500 fine and up to 93 days in jail. This is only the first time offense. Get caught again, and the penalty becomes even steeper.

You need to get your life rolling again. We highly recommend you hire a legal team with experienced driver’s license attorneys in Lansing, such as the attorneys at Grabel & Associates. After the duration of your suspension runs out, then you may apply for license restoration.

The ease of beginning the process of suspension depends on whether the incident that caused the suspension involved substance abuse or not. If there was no substance abuse involved it will be slightly easier to get your license back.

Suspension not involving an OWI/High-BAC

Suspensions have a start date and an end date assigned upon the start of the suspension. You will have to wait out the duration of the suspension in all cases before applying for license restoration. These suspension periods will vary depending on the nature of your offense. If your suspension did not involve an OWI/High-BAC, you will apply at your local DMV branch. You will need several documents and proofs to proceed in this way: a valid I.D., proof of Michigan residency, your social security number, and an Application for Driver’s License Reinstatement. In addition to these things, there will be an application fee of $125. After submission, the state will decide whether or not end the suspension on your license.

If you followed the advice of your attorney and avoided driving while suspended, your privilege should be restored. In order to ensure that you have the best chance of getting your license reinstated, you should contact the driver’s license attorneys at Grabel & Associates immediately. We have years of expertise and knowledge to get your case back for consideration and your license reinstated.

Suspension involving an OWI/High-BAC

Applying for reinstatement after an OWI violation is slightly more difficult, but it can be done. Depending on whether or not you received an OWI, OWPC (Operating with any Presence of Scheduled 1 Drug or Cocaine) or a High-BAC content, your license could be suspended for 30 days with an additional 150 days of license restriction or it could be suspended for a full year.

For OWIs and OWPC, you will face the 30-day suspension and the 150 days of license restriction. You will pay between $100 and $500 in fines and either do one of the following: spend 93 days in jail or do 360 hours of community service. Six points will be added to your driving record, and your vehicle could be immobilized. You may also have to have an ignition interlock installed. In these cases, it is best to wait out the suspension and comply with any fines or community service hours.

If you are caught with a High-BAC offense, meaning your BAC was .17 or higher, your license will be suspended for one solid year. You will also have to do one or more of the following: pay between $200 and $700 in fines, spend 180 days in jail, or perform 360 hours of community service. After 45 days, you will be able to apply for a restricted license.

Your Michigan restricted license will get you back on the road, but you must have a breath alcohol ignition interlock device (BAIID) installed on your primary vehicle. To start your car, you will need to blow into the device, and so long as you are sober, the car should start. To prove that the BAIID has been installed, you must send documentation to the Michigan Secretary of State office branch. You can find the Lansing branch at 3315 E Michigan Ave., Lansing, MI 48912.

Restricted licenses are either “when” licenses or “where” licenses. “When” licenses allow for driving between certain hours. There are no restrictions on where you can go, but you may only operate a vehicle between the designated hours. The “where” license allows you to drive to particular locations (school, work, etc.) as much as you want. However, you must carry proof of your intended destination. A class schedule, proof of employment, proof of an appointment will all suffice. You will also be able to drive yourself or a family member to the hospital in extreme medical emergencies as well.

Your license will not be suspended forever. Once the suspension period is over, you can ask the Administrative Hearings Section of the Michigan Department of State to grant you an Order/Authorization to Remove Breath Alcohol Ignition Interlock Device. The reinstatement fee will still be $125.

Grabel & Associates have been defending the residents of Lansing and the greater Michigan area for 10 years. With over 100 years of legal expertise between our associates, we have the legal know-how and defense strategies to get your license reinstated. We are ready to represent you 24/7. Call us at 1-800-342-7896 or contact us online now.