Auto Theft in Lansing

In the mid-1980s, auto theft was a major problem in Lansing, with more auto thefts occurring in Michigan than any other state in the union.

Since then, actions have been taken to crack down on auto theft in Lansing, but some of these measures have led to trumped up charges and wrongful convictions. If you think you may be charged with an auto theft crime or have already been charged, do not wait another minute to call Grabel & Associates. Our aggressive team of theft attorneys in Lansing will work with you to make sure that your rights are protected.

Grand Theft Auto Charges

A grand theft auto charge is not a video game in Lansing. It is a serious charge that can send a convicted person to jail or compel them to pay heavy fines. In general, thefts can be classified as either a misdemeanor or a felony depending on the value of the property in question. Property that is valued at less than $500 is usually considered a misdemeanor or petty theft.

Grand theft auto, however, is a little different. In most cases, the theft of any motor vehicle is automatic grounds for a grand theft auto charge.

Convictions for grand theft auto will vary depending on the value of the car that was stolen as well as the types of previous convictions the defendant has. At the very least, the convicted person will spend up to one year in prison and pay a fine. If this is not the convicted person's first offense, then he or she may be looking at 10 or even 15 years imprisonment along with high fines.

Navigating a grand theft auto charge is not easy. You need an experienced attorney by your side that understands the law and can help you beat any charges. Call an associate at Grabel & Associates today.

Joyriding

Lansing, as well as the rest of the state, defines joyriding as taking another person's car without permission. Joyriding has both a misdemeanor and felony charge, and you are probably most familiar with the misdemeanor.

Section 750.414 of the Michigan Penal Code defines the misdemeanor charge as using the motor vehicle beyond the scope of the owner's permission. In this instance, a child might take a parent's car for an unapproved ride, or an employee might take a company car for personal business. Both joyriders never intended to steal the car, which is a major distinction between the misdemeanor and felony charge.

Punishments for joyriding misdemeanors vary depending on the situation and the type of prior convictions a person has before the joyriding conviction. A first offense may lead to up to three months in jail or a fine of no more than $500. In some cases, both punishments may be applied. If this is not a first offense, a conviction may lead to up to two years in prison and a fine of no more than $1,500.

Joyriding is most often committed by teenagers and others under the age of 21, but prosecutors have been known to turn a joyriding charge into Unlawfully Driving Away in an Automobile, which we will discuss next. If you or your teenager is facing a joyriding charge, call Grabel & Associates.

Unlawfully Driving Away an Automobile

The felony version of joyriding, unlawfully driving away an automobile (UDAA), is more serious. This crime occurs when another person takes possession of a motor vehicle that lawfully belongs to another person. The offender then willfully drives away with the car. This crime is considered a felony and can have serious ramifications on a convicted person's future.

Under Section 750.413 of the Michigan Penal Code, this felony conviction results in up to five years in a state prison.

The law extends to those assisting or helping another person commit UDAA. If a person is caught helping another person take possession of a car – for example, by hot-wiring it or stealing the keys - then he or she will also face similar charges and potential prison time.

These charges can alter the course of your life. You may have a difficult time finding employment with a UDAA conviction on your record. Do not let this conviction ruin your life. Get an experienced motor vehicle attorney on your side with Grabel & Associates.

Buying, Possessing, or Concealing a Stolen Vehicle

When you are buying a car, you trust that the seller owns the car in question because buying, possessing, or concealing a stolen vehicle in Michigan is not a charge you want to face alone.

Section 750.535 outlines this charge, stating that any person who possesses, buys, receives, conceals, or aids in the concealment of a stolen motor vehicle or knows at the time of purchase that a vehicle was stolen, embezzled, or converted can be charged with this crime. A felony conviction can lead to as many as five years in prison or a fine of either $10,000 or three times the value of the vehicle. The court will use whichever one is greater.

If you unknowingly buy a stolen vehicle then find yourself facing these charges, call Grabel & Associates. We will work with you to fight these charges and see that you do not serve time.

Contact Grabel & Associates

Facing an auto theft charge in Lansing is not something you want to face down alone. The consequences of a conviction are severe, and they can change your whole life. Your finances may take a dive when you need to pay the high fines, and your reputation may suffer in your community due to your arrest. When you are going up against such charges, the best thing to do is to contact a skilled attorney from Grabel & Associates.

Contact us today by calling toll free at 1-800-342-7896 or contact us through our website. Start building a strong defense with Grabel & Associates today.